The Catholic Church established this form of consecrated life in 1947 for people who wish to combine the contemplative and the apostolic life while living in the world. Secular institutes provide members with a community of like-minded people who put God first in their lives and everything else second.

 

There are over thirty secular institutes in the United States, each having its own rule and lifestyle, period of formation and ongoing animation.

 

 

According to the norms of consecrated life in the Church, all members of secular institutes take up the counsels of Jesus Christ to:

 

-live simply (poverty)

-chastely (chastity)

-discerningly (obedience).

 

The point and purpose of their lives is to bring the Good News of Christ everywhere! By a "life perfectly and entirely consecrated to... sanctification," the members of these institutes share in the Church's task of evangelization.

 

 

"In the world and from within the world," their presence acts as "leaven in the world." (Pius XII, Provida Mater; cf. PC 11)
 

They work with the power of love... Members of secular institutes aim "to order temporal things according to God and inform the world with the power of the gospel." (Pius XII, Provida Mater; cf. PC 11)
 

How do members share community?

They commit themselves to the evangelical counsels by sacred bonds and observe among themselves the communion and fellowship appropriate to their particular secular way of life. (cf. CIC, Can. 713,2)